The Production Garden Abounds!

With help from our Internal Relations Coordinator and Master Gardener, Shira Goodman, Filbert Street Garden has successfully launched the production garden for the 2023 season. The production garden is a smaller fenced off area, located in between the bee yard and the shade area. The garden has 12 raised beds, all of them dedicated to growing vegetables for the community. In the spring, the production garden produced radishes, peas, spinach, lettuce, carrots, scallions and arugula. Now that summer is in full swing, the garden has pivoted to all of our favorite summertime veggies, including tomatoes, green beans, cucumbers, zucchini, eggplant, beets, okra, peppers and tomatillos.

Shira makes it a priority to visit the production garden at least three times a week, and spends her time weeding, pruning, trellising, tackling pests, planting, and most importantly, harvesting. The garden’s produce goes to our Little Free Pantry! The stewards also help keep the production garden afloat by watering daily and taking on additional tasks as needed.

If you’re interested in expanding your vegetable garden knowledge and skill set, the production garden could use your help! Please email Shira Goodman at [email protected] to coordinate a time to volunteer. You’ll be able to learn from an experienced gardener, and help contribute to feeding the Curtis Bay community.

Update on Native Plants Project

We’re excited to be entering phase three of our native garden project! Phase one consisted of planting native trees and shrubs along the 4000 sq ft outer fence line on Elmtree Street. We have installed 15 trees including persimmon, elderberry, chokeberry, Eastern redbud, serviceberry, and paw paw. All of these trees also have the benefits of being edible! 

Phase two was the installment of a pollinator garden and edible native raised bed. This is located inside the fence, next to our bee yard. Plants were chosen intentionally to ensure blooms from early Spring through first frost in order to keep our many honey bee hives well stocked and happy! 

Phase three involves planting native flower gardens between the trees and shrubs that were installed in phase one. This will fill out the space while adding a number of habitats and food sources for native species. 

With this project, we aim to channel the principals of regenerative agriculture, which means nurturing and restoring soil health while facilitating increased biodiversity. We hope you’re able to enjoy the blooms, native species, and edible fruits from these efforts for years to come! We are endlessly thankful to the varied and eager volunteers who have made this work possible. 

– Brittany Coverdale, Garden Steward